Western Lecture Series

Engaging speakers and scholars deliver talks on a variety of academic subjects and world affairs. Presentations are designed to expand your knowledge base, provoke thought, enhance understanding and inspire creativity. Every lecture introduces a distinct and interesting topic. Offered throughout the year, the Western Lecture Series is free and open to the public. Registration is not required.

Zoning Out: Life in the Intertidal - COURSE HAS BEEN CANCELLED

Date: Wednesday, Sept. 27
Time: 6-7 p.m.
Location: SEA Discovery Center, 18743 Front St., Poulsbo
Cost: Free, registration not required

Ever noticed how different organisms seem to dominate different zones in the intertidal? What’s behind this zonation, and why is it so clear in some places and less so in others? Come and find the answers as well as how intertidal communities might respond to changing conditions.

Presenter: Dr. Jennie Hoffman


Coffee, Cake and True Islam: Philosophy of the Teachings of Islam

Date: Monday, Oct. 9
Time: 6-7 p.m.
Location: Olympic College-Poulsbo,  Room 105, 1000 Olympic College Way NW
Cost: Free, registration not required. Open to the public

Explore the big-picture questions of why Islam exists as a religion, what it teaches, what is the ultimate goal for its followers and how that goal can be achieved. This lecture presents some essential teachings of the faith and delves into the philosophy of Islam for a deeper understanding.

Presenter: Waqas Malik


The Turtle Survival Alliance

Date: Monday, Oct. 16
Time: 6-7 p.m.
Location: Olympic College-Poulsbo,  Room 220, 1000 Olympic College Way NW
Cost: Free, registration not required. Open to the public

The Turtle Survival Alliance (TSA) is a global conservation group whose goal is zero turtle extinctions. Learn about methods employed toward that end, including range programs throughout the world concentrating on highly endangered species and focusing on breeding and releasing programs as well as wild turtle population monitoring and research.  TSA operates the Turtle Survival Center in South Carolina, which houses breeding populations of 20 of the top 25 most endangered species of turtles in the world, including some that are extinct in the wild.

Presenter: Eric Munscher, M.Sc.


Humanties Washington logo

The Pine and the Cherry: Japanese Americans in Washington

Date: Tuesday, Oct. 17
Time: 6-7 p.m.
Location: Poulsbo City Hall, Council Chambers, 200 Moe St. NE, Poulsbo
Cost: Free, registration not required

In the lead-up to World War II, Japantown in Seattle featured grocery stores, cafes, and native-language services, as well as labor and music clubs. Trading companies imported Japanese goods, and restaurants served the familiar sukiyaki, tofu, and miso soup. In Eastern Washington, Japanese farmers prospered. Then came Executive Order 9066. Throughout the West Coast, 120,000 Japanese-Americans were forced from their homes. When they returned, most had lost everything and could not find jobs. How did they face this injustice and rebuild their lives? Mayumi Tsutakawa reveals her family’s 100-year history against the backdrop of this dramatic American story.

Presenter: Mayumi Tsutakawa

About Humanties Washington: Humanities Washington sparks conversation and critical thinking using story as a catalyst, nurturing thoughtful and engaged communities across our state. For more about Humanities Washington, visit www.humanities.org


Humanties Washington logoCrazy Politics: Populism, Conspiracy Theories, and Paranoia in America

Date: Thursday, Nov. 9
Time: 6-7 p.m.
Location: Poulsbo City Hall, Council Chambers, 200 Moe St. NE, Poulsbo
Cost: Free, registration not required

Anti-establishment candidates rail against the government they seek to lead; populist groups like the Tea Party or Occupy Wall Street howl about corruption in political and economic institutions; and wild conspiracy theories abound. Has American politics always been so crazy?

With political science professor Cornell Clayton, explore how American politics has become an arena for suspicious and angry minds. Rather than debunking today’s conspiratorial claims, Clayton argues that both populism and a paranoid thinking have always played important roles in American politics. From the fear of the Illuminati, to the Know-Nothing movement in the 1850s, to Father Charles Coughlin, Huey Long, and the John Birchers, there always have been leaders and groups who see politics in apocalyptic terms and believe powerful elites are conspiring against ordinary Americans. Clayton’s talk explains the rise of today’s populist and conspiratorial politics, draws parallels to earlier periods, and describes how populism on the left and right today differ.

Presenter: Cornell Clayton

About Humanties Washington: Humanities Washington sparks conversation and critical thinking using story as a catalyst, nurturing thoughtful and engaged communities across our state. For more about Humanities Washington, visit www.humanities.org


Darwin's Lost Theory of Love: A Healing Vision for the New Century  

Date: Wednesday, Nov. 15
Time: 6-7 p.m.
Location: Olympic College-Poulsbo,  Room 105, 1000 Olympic College Way NW
Cost: Free, registration not required. Open to the public

Charles Darwin’s original writings made a strong case for the importance of education, love, moral sensitivity, and civil behavior to forward human evolution. Those aspects of his theory have often been overlooked, if not viewed with disdain. Revisit Darwin’s theory, this time with the inclusion of the concept of becoming “fully human.” Examine the power of language, habit, caring and reflecting, In this talk, speakers Bernard and May will recount “Darwin’s lost theory” and show how it is applicable to work with conflict prevention and resolution.

Presenter: Phyllis Bernard and Dann May


Humanties Washington logoWhite Privilege: The Other Side of Racial Inequality

Date: Tuesday, Jan. 23
Time: 6-7 p.m.
Location: TBD
Cost: Free, registration not required. Open to the public

Conversations about racial inequality usually focus on the disadvantages faced by people of color in American society. But there is another side to this inequality: privilege—the advantages that white people experience because of their race. Sociology professor Teresa Ciabattari leads an interactive conversation that explores what white privilege is, discusses a variety of examples of privilege for individuals and institutions, and provides tools for learning how to address it. Participants will gain knowledge and resources to foster inclusion and racial justice in their own communities.

Presenter: Teresa Ciabbattariy

About Humanties Washington: Humanities Washington sparks conversation and critical thinking using story as a catalyst, nurturing thoughtful and engaged communities across our state. For more about Humanities Washington, visit www.humanities.org.


Humanties Washington logoWhat Our Teachers Never Told Us about the American Revolution

Date: Tuesday, March 6
Time: 6-8 p.m.
Location: TBD
Cost: Free, registration not required. Open to the public

Discover the American Revolution you never learned about in school. Why did Native Americans and African Americans support the British? How did a Muslim general come to fight the British with a French ally named Admiral “Satan”? Why did the fighting spread around the world, from Hudson Bay to South America, India to Africa, Arkansas to Gibraltar?

Presenter: Don Glickstein

About Humanties Washington: Humanities Washington sparks conversation and critical thinking using story as a catalyst, nurturing thoughtful and engaged communities across our state. For more about Humanities Washington, visit www.humanities.org

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