Western Lecture Series

Engaging speakers and scholars deliver talks on a variety of academic subjects and world affairs. Presentations are designed to expand your knowledge base, provoke thought, enhance understanding and inspire creativity. Every lecture introduces a distinct and interesting topic. Offered throughout the year, the Western Lecture Series is free and open to the public. Registration is not required.

Humanties Washington logoWhite Privilege: The Other Side of Racial Inequality

Date: Tuesday, Jan. 23
Time: 6-7 p.m.
Location: Olympic College-Poulsbo, Room 105, 1000 Olympic College Way NW
Cost: Free, registration not required. Open to the public

Conversations about racial inequality usually focus on the disadvantages faced by people of color in American society. But there is another side to this inequality: privilege—the advantages that white people experience because of their race. Sociology professor Teresa Ciabattari leads an interactive conversation that explores what white privilege is, discusses a variety of examples of privilege for individuals and institutions, and provides tools for learning how to address it. Participants will gain knowledge and resources to foster inclusion and racial justice in their own communities.

Presenter: Teresa Ciabattari

About Humanties Washington: Humanities Washington sparks conversation and critical thinking using story as a catalyst, nurturing thoughtful and engaged communities across our state. For more about Humanities Washington, visit www.humanities.org.


Sea Grant WashingtonWSU extension programs logoEstuary Restoration in Kitsap County: Plant Recovery and Soil Development within Four Estuary Restoration Projects

Date: Tuesday, February 6, 2018
Time: 6-7 p.m.
Location: Norm Dicks Center, 345 6th Street, Bremerton; 1st Floor Chambers
Cost: Free, registration not required. Open to the public

Vegetation and soil play an important role in the health of an estuary’s ecosystem. Culverts, bridges and other physical barriers reduce the inflow of water and the exchange of sediment and isolate what should be connected habitats. What happens when the barriers are removed? A recent research project monitored the restoration of four estuary sites in Western Washington and tested the hypothesis that recovery of a restored area continues over a significant period of time. Find out more about this important restoration work, what was studied, what was learned, and how the results can assist in planning for the restoration of other estuary environments. 

Presenter: Dr. Jenise Bauman


Educating the True Human Being

Date: Tuesday, February 20, 2018
Time: 6-7 p.m.
Location: Olympic College-Poulsbo, Room 105, 1000 Olympic College Way NW
Cost: Free, registration not required. Open to the public

In a world of racial and political tensions, violence, civil unrest, terrorism, and war, how can peace gain a foothold? How can we begin to break down the “us versus them” mentality that allows violent conditions to persist?  Phyllis Bernard makes the case that, “education that values both intellect and integrity can reshape communities and the world.”  This presentation explores ways in which we might nurture and educate a generation of true human beings who will be prepared to engage in a lifelong series of small deeds that result in a more peaceful world.

Presenter: Phyllis Bernard


The Climate Reality Project: Hope for the Future

Date: Tuesday, February 27, 2018
Time: 6-7 p.m.
Location: Olympic College-Poulsbo, Room 105, 1000 Olympic College Way NW
Cost: Free, registration not required. Open to the public

With seas rising, global heat records falling, and storms becoming more and more devastating, the reality of climate change has never been clearer. With clean energy solutions like wind and solar getting more affordable, batteries getting better, and buildings becoming more efficient every year, we can see the way forward. The good news doesn’t end there. Thanks to 195 countries signing the historic Paris Agreement to cut greenhouse gas emissions planet-wide, the world is united in working for a safe and sustainable future with net-zero carbon emissions by the second half of this century. Climate Reality is working to accelerate the global shift from activities driving climate change to renewables so we can power our lives and economies without destroying our planet. But we can only do it together with a deep understanding of the current global situation and the science behind it.

Presenter: Dr. Adelia Ritchie


The Climate Reality Project: Hope for the Future

Date: Wednesday, February 28, 2018
Time: 6-7 p.m.
Location: Olympic College-Shelton, The Johnson Library Reading
Cost: Free, registration not required. Open to the public

With seas rising, global heat records falling, and storms becoming more and more devastating, the reality of climate change has never been clearer. With clean energy solutions like wind and solar getting more affordable, batteries getting better, and buildings becoming more efficient every year, we can see the way forward. The good news doesn’t end there. Thanks to 195 countries signing the historic Paris Agreement to cut greenhouse gas emissions planet-wide, the world is united in working for a safe and sustainable future with net-zero carbon emissions by the second half of this century. Climate Reality is working to accelerate the global shift from activities driving climate change to renewables so we can power our lives and economies without destroying our planet. But we can only do it together with a deep understanding of the current global situation and the science behind it.

Presenter: Dr. Adelia Ritchie


The Climate Reality Project: Hope for the Future

Date: Thursday, March 1, 2018
Time: 6-7 p.m.
Location: Peninsula College - Port Townsend
Cost: Free, registration not required. Open to the public

With seas rising, global heat records falling, and storms becoming more and more devastating, the reality of climate change has never been clearer. With clean energy solutions like wind and solar getting more affordable, batteries getting better, and buildings becoming more efficient every year, we can see the way forward. The good news doesn’t end there. Thanks to 195 countries signing the historic Paris Agreement to cut greenhouse gas emissions planet-wide, the world is united in working for a safe and sustainable future with net-zero carbon emissions by the second half of this century. Climate Reality is working to accelerate the global shift from activities driving climate change to renewables so we can power our lives and economies without destroying our planet. But we can only do it together with a deep understanding of the current global situation and the science behind it.

Presenter: Dr. Adelia Ritchie


Humanties Washington logoWhat Our Teachers Never Told Us about the American Revolution

Date: Tuesday, March 6
Time: 6-7 p.m.
Location: Poulsbo City Hall, Council Chambers, 200 Moe St. NE, Poulsbo
Cost: Free, registration not required. Open to the public

Discover the American Revolution you never learned about in school. Why did Native Americans and African Americans support the British? How did a Muslim general come to fight the British with a French ally named Admiral “Satan”? Why did the fighting spread around the world, from Hudson Bay to South America, India to Africa, Arkansas to Gibraltar?

Presenter: Don Glickstein

About Humanties Washington: Humanities Washington sparks conversation and critical thinking using story as a catalyst, nurturing thoughtful and engaged communities across our state. For more about Humanities Washington, visit www.humanities.org


The Climate Reality Project: Hope for the Future

Date: Thursday, March 22, 2018
Time: 6-7 p.m.
Location: Norm Dicks Center, 345 6th St., Bremerton, 1st Floor Chambers
Cost: Free, registration not required. Open to the public

With seas rising, global heat records falling, and storms becoming more and more devastating, the reality of climate change has never been clearer. With clean energy solutions like wind and solar getting more affordable, batteries getting better, and buildings becoming more efficient every year, we can see the way forward. The good news doesn’t end there. Thanks to 195 countries signing the historic Paris Agreement to cut greenhouse gas emissions planet-wide, the world is united in working for a safe and sustainable future with net-zero carbon emissions by the second half of this century. Climate Reality is working to accelerate the global shift from activities driving climate change to renewables so we can power our lives and economies without destroying our planet. But we can only do it together with a deep understanding of the current global situation and the science behind it.

Presenter: Dr. Adelia Ritchie


Calling BS in an Age of Misinformation

Date: Thursday, March 22, 2018
Time: 6-7 p.m.
Location: Poulsbo City Council Chambers, 200 NE Moe St.
Cost: Free, registration not required. Open to the public

Over the last few years, there has been an increase in the production and consumption of false news stories and memes, which come from all sides of the political spectrum, industry and society. This lecture spotlights some of the reasons behind the onslaught of misinformation in our digital environments and how we can overcome it.

Presenter: Jevin West


Sea Grant WashingtonWSU extension programs logoEstuary Restoration in Kitsap County: Plant Recovery and Soil Development within Four Estuary Restoration Projects

Date: Tuesday, April 24, 2018
Time: 6-7 p.m.
Location: Olympic College-Poulsbo,  Room 105, 1000 Olympic College Way NW
Cost: Free, registration not required. Open to the public

Vegetation and soil play an important role in the health of an estuary’s ecosystem. Culverts, bridges and other physical barriers reduce the inflow of water and the exchange of sediment and isolate what should be connected habitats. What happens when the barriers are removed? A recent research project monitored the restoration of four estuary sites in Western Washington and tested the hypothesis that recovery of a restored area continues over a significant period of time. Find out more about this important restoration work, what was studied, what was learned, and how the results can assist in planning for the restoration of other estuary environments. 

Presenter: Dr. Jenise Bauman


Exotic Terranes of the Pacific Northwest

Date: Thursday, April 26, 2018
Time: 5:30-7 p.m.
Location: Olympic College-Poulsbo,  Room 105, 1000 Olympic College Way NW
Cost: Free, registration not required. Open to the public

The basement bedrock of the Pacific Northwest - often overlooked - is full of amazing stories and ongoing research full of debate and drama. What do the San Juan Islands, the Stuart Range, Mt. Si, and Hells Canyon have in common? They are all made of exotic terrane material that has oceanic origins long ago. Learn how new geologic techniques are helping support the idea that much of Washington’s oldest bedrock was created in the Pacific Ocean, added to Mexico, and then sent more than 1,000 miles to Washington!

Presenter: Nick Zentner


Viking DNA: Reexamining the Scandinavian Conquest of Great Britain? 

Date: Tuesday, May 15, 2018
Time: 6-7 p.m.
Location: Poulsbo City Hall, Council Chambers, 200 Moe St. NE, Poulsbo
Cost: Free, registration not required. Open to the public

Recent advances in DNA technology are changing the way historians, archaeologist and anthropologists are modeling the settlement and migration patterns of ancient peoples. Not the least of which are the Scandinavians of the fifth through 12th centuries. Several DNA studies largely debunk earlier theories that the Scandinavians were solely raiders who raped and pillaged their way across England in search of silver and gold. By utilizing a multidisciplinary approach, scholars are finding the history and legacy of the Scandinavians to be much more complex than ever realized. This lecture  highlights some of the more recent discoveries  and, as well, dispels many long-standing beliefs about these remarkable seafarers.   

Presenter: Patrick Lowinger

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